• Shanghai Grand

    Shanghai Grand takes Grescoe and his readers far from Montreal – not only to a distant land but also to a very different time. Its story unrolls in the streets, nightclubs, luxury hotels, and shikumen lane courtyards of Jazz Age Shanghai.

  • Small Beauty

    Small Beauty follows the story of Xiao Mei, a young mixed race Chinese trans woman coming to terms with the loss of her cousin, Sandy. Abandoning the city – along with its labyrinthine welfare system and the complicated community of trans women she’s fought hard to become part of – Mei runs back to the small town where she and Sandy grew up in order to try to work out her feelings.

  • Nicolas

    First published in 2008, the small, sparsely rendered story of a nine-year-old boy’s attempts to come to terms with the death of his five-year-old brother did more than just launch the comics career of Jonquière-born Girard; it became a word-of-mouth cult item inspiring a rare devotion in its readers. People press Nicolas on friends, give it as a gift, revisit it in times of need.

All posts

Marconi

The Montreal Review of Books invited Marc Raboy, author of Marconi: The Man Who Networked the World, to answer a few questions about Guglielmo Marconi’s enduring significance and the experience of writing his biography.

Then and Now

Forty-eight and finally, I learn how to start living if that’s what it’s called. I mean, spring clean, bras cup-side up in the drawer, Japanese fantail dress detail, only some excess, and five-inch Louis Vuitton ‘Kimono’ heels. Coffee at an East Village bodega on Christmas day. December sun on walk-ups While we sat in that […]

Untitled (“We eat strawberries”)

We eat strawberries and snort Adderall Alek hands me some sort of craft beer and I think bad thoughts about America again I peel the label off and curse it It seems like a half-hearted attempt to be a Good Guy, a Myth. I practice Lying with men It’s easy, it’s all they want to […]

By Sara Sutterlin • "Untitled (“We eat strawberries”)" is taken from the book I Wanted to Be the Knife, published by Metatron • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month

Women and Power

Women and Power packs an impressive amount of information into a few pages, serving as an astute update on the issue of gender parity in Quebec and Canada. But beyond just taking stock, the book advances an appealing vision.

Hungary-Hollywood Express

Fragment follows fragment like thoughts in a mind suspended between waking and sleeping, and again and again the book returns to the life of actor and Olympian Johnny Weissmuller. And yet this novel, the first part of a trilogy, isn’t a difficult read. The prose is translucent, flowing, beautifully translated from its original French by Dimitri Nasrallah.

Untitled (“I will present a huge fire”)

I will present a huge fire I will burn the residential schools the paper acts And with a single gust of wind brush away every pipeline the caribou will come running with the buffalo the horses the deer there will be a great trembling The caribou the buffalo the horses the deer will come with […]

By Natasha Kanapé Fontaine • "Untitled (“I will present a huge fire”)" is taken from the book Assi Manifesto, published by Mawenzi House • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month

The Party Wall

After winning several prestigious awards in its original French, Catherine Leroux’s second novel, The Party Wall, expertly translated into English by Lazer Lederhendler, has been shortlisted for this year’s Giller Prize and for a Governor General’s Literary Award for translation. And deservedly so.

A Grip on the Stars

I arrive wrapped in typhoon, blue grey wet blanket airless and unsettled. Strips of wallpaper curl an inch a day. I am adhesive diluted, unable to dry. When I packed, I found lost letters behind my bed, books I never knew I owned. Leaving is a process of remembering, a realization that to stay is […]

By Gillian Sze and Alison Strumberger • "A Grip on the Stars" is taken from the book Redrafting Winter, published by BuschekBooks • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month