• Accordéon

    Kaie Kellough’s Accordéon is a smart experimental novel with a timely message about culture and diversity in the city of Montreal.

  • Arabic for Beginners

    Arabic for Beginners, a shape-shifting fictional narrative by Ariela Freedman, is a nuanced and penetrating exploration of life in Israel today.

  • Tumbleweed

    In Tumbleweed, Josip Novakovich is equipped with a deep writer’s arsenal – a sharp eye for the telling detail, a subtly rhythmic prose style, and deadpan humour.

  • In on the Great Joke

    “Right words sound wrong,” Laura Broadbent opens in her latest book, In on the Great Joke. Borrowing Lao Tzu’s words, Broadbent explores this “wrongness” of language, its limits, mistranslations, and shortcomings.

All posts

The Tundra at last

The Tundra at last
Resound my heart
Your music, the river
Your light, the stars
Your carpet, the lichen’s tender green

By Joséphine Bacon • "The Tundra at last" is taken from the book A Tea in the Tundra / Nipishapui Nete Mushuat, published by BookLand Press • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month Leave a comment

Hostage

Hostage is the account, as told to Delisle, of how a Doctors Without Borders worker in Nazran, Russia, was kidnapped by Chechen rebels in 1997 and held for three months in an undisclosed location. And there, handcuffed to a radiator in a bare room with a boarded-up window, trying to maintain hope, is where we find Christophe André for most of this remarkable book’s 400-plus pages.

Spacetime

We Twitter, Tinder, Tumblr through eternity. Loquacious text messages flit from fingertips, waves of data spill through our skulls. Every cm2 of oxygen overflowing with bank PINs, girls in yoga pants, the frequencies of whale cries. Digital clouds brim with selfies and rain videos on how to cook coconut shrimp. Sepia filtered photographs prowl for […]

By Yusuf Saadi • "Spacetime" is taken from the book Sonnets on a Night Without Love, published by Vallum • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month

Polynya

With the continuing popularity of Scandinavian noir, it was only a matter of time before someone tried their hand at outright Arctic noir. With her second novel Polynya, Montreal author Mélanie Vincelette gamely steps up to the plate with a murder mystery – of sorts – set in Nunavut.

Placeholder image for missing book cover

Job Opportunity at mRb

Are you passionate about books, high-quality writing, and serial commas? Then we want to hear from you! Join the team putting together the only journal reviewing English-language books from Quebec. The Montreal Review of Books seeks an experienced and dynamic Associate Editor to work with the Editor and Publisher on all aspects of the journal. The Associate Editor […]

Tabagie Arsenault, 1920–1972

Arsenault’s Tobacco Magazines Novelties is closing: everyone has locked arms and is dancing. The Arsenaults have given away flags, trinkets, greeting cards from the ’40s. Everyone dances so that the floor shakes like the floor of a boat while musicians huddle in a corner, hardly noticing the audience, and young men shouldering film cameras as […]

By Marc Plourde • "Tabagie Arsenault, 1920–1972" is taken from the book Borrowed Days, published by Comorant Books • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month

Spaniel Rage

Cartoonist Vanessa Davis made a big name for herself in 2010 with Make Me A Woman, a relatable, endearing, and funny book. Spaniel Rage, which was Davis’s first attempt at comics, contains hints of her work to come.

Like Noise of the Pouring River

Like   noise   of the   pouring   river the mind  lets  go,   throws  spray like   water’s   pulse   and hurl. What’s   true   for    the    waterfall is true  for  the water  before  its fall, at the brink recalls and recoils,  spins  and  rolls  forward into  that  fall.   It  never  runs  out, never   loses   the weight of  its being,  the […]

By Edward Carson • "Like Noise of the Pouring River" is taken from the book Knots, published by McGill-Queen’s University Press • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month

Marconi

The Montreal Review of Books invited Marc Raboy, author of Marconi: The Man Who Networked the World, to answer a few questions about Guglielmo Marconi’s enduring significance and the experience of writing his biography.

Then and Now

Forty-eight and finally, I learn how to start living if that’s what it’s called. I mean, spring clean, bras cup-side up in the drawer, Japanese fantail dress detail, only some excess, and five-inch Louis Vuitton ‘Kimono’ heels. Coffee at an East Village bodega on Christmas day. December sun on walk-ups While we sat in that […]

By Nyla Matuk • "Then and Now" is taken from the book Stranger, published by Signal Editions • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month