Blue Met Events to Check Out!
Published on April 18, 2012

The Blue Met Festival officially starts today and there are a few events in which AELAQ members (i.e. Quebec English-language publishers) and Quebec English writers are involved. Have a look!

 

Thursday, April 19

Montreal writer Peter Dubé launches his new book, The City’s Gates, 5:30 p.m., at the Gallery.

QWF’s online magazine, carte blanche, will be telling true stories, 8:00 p.m., at the Salon St-Laurent.

 

 

Friday, April 20

Quebec crime writer Trevor Ferguson (a.k.a John Farrow) will offer a literary show based on his latest novel, River City, 5:30 p.m. at the Jardin.

Monteal writer Tess Fragoulis launches her new book, The Goodtime Girl, 5:30 p.m., at the Gallery.

The main character of Quebec award-winning crime writer Louise Penny, Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, is given the dramatic treatment by playwright and Rover publisher Marianne Ackerman, 7:00 p.m., at the Salon St-Laurent.

Blue Met founder and AELAQ member Linda Leith will be launching the first books of her brand-new publishing company, 7:00 p.m., at the Gallery.

Montreal writers Tess Fragoulis and Felicia Mihali talk about their new novels, 8:30 p.m., at the Jardin.

 

Saturday, April 21

Quebec writers Daniel Allan Cox and Peter Dubé will be reading from their recent works, 2:00 p.m., at the Gallery.

AELAQ member DC Books launches four new books and celebrates its 25th anniversary, 4:00 p.m., at the Gallery.

 mRb event: Montreal Noir: The City’s Forgotten Pulp Past, 8:30 p.m., at the Salon St-Laurent.

 

 

 

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