Just One Little Light

A review of Just One Little Light by Kat Yeh

Published on July 5, 2023

Opening the cover of Just One Little Light, the gouache, charcoal, and soft pastel illustrations by Isabelle Arsenault immediately draw readers into the heart of the book. The gentle narrative carefully put together by Kat Yeh holds our hand at the turn of every page. In the darkness, so artfully depicted through Arsenault’s craft, Yeh’s words pave the way, calling to the light inside each and every one of us.

Just One Little Light
Kat Yeh
Illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault

HarperCollins
$24.99
cloth
32pp
9780063094963

In this book, both author and illustrator come together seamlessly as they encourage readers to move through the thick, dark cloud that alludes to the heavy emotions that sometimes stop us in our tracks and just don’t seem to go away. Evoking pleasant memories of elementary school scratch art projects, every breath we take and every reminder about the courage we have within chips away at the darkness, revealing the bright, colourful beauty that lies on the other side.

With the one little light that we each hold, Yeh and Arsenault’s book is the stepping stone at our feet. And, with every step forward, we discover that we are not alone, but a part of something much greater than what the momentary darkness might have us believe – a deep and resonating message worth sharing with readers of all ages.mRb

Phoebe Yī Lìng is a freelance writer, editor, and full-time explorer. She currently works with the Nunavik Inuit community as a Gladue writer and sometimes spends her time dabbling in experimental performance or marvelling at the complexities of intra/interpersonal communication.

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