• Planetary Noise

    Openness, dissection, reconstruction, and the wringing out of language are key to the newly released Planetary Noise. Celebrating one of North America’s most prolific and groundbreaking poets, this anthology also honours Moure’s ongoing project of embracing the fallibility of language and, by extension, of poetry itself.

  • Road Through Time

    Mary Soderstrom might just be my new favourite writer. She’s been writing for years, and we’ve been reading her for years, but meeting her reveals an energy that is contagious, and a humility that should be. Soderstrom in person is as unassuming, open, and delightful as she is erudite and elegant on the page.

  • Waking Gods

    Taking place nine years after the events of Sleeping Giants, Waking Gods flips everything we learned in the first volume on its head. When an alien robot related to Themis arrives in downtown London, followed by a dozen others who take up residence in the most populous cities in the world, it’s no spoiler to say that the results are a little bit destructive.

All posts

Like Noise of the Pouring River

Like   noise   of the   pouring   river the mind  lets  go,   throws  spray like   water’s   pulse   and hurl. What’s   true   for    the    waterfall is true  for  the water  before  its fall, at the brink recalls and recoils,  spins  and  rolls  forward into  that  fall.   It  never  runs  out, never   loses   the weight of  its being,  the […]

By Edward Carson • "Like Noise of the Pouring River" is taken from the book Knots, published by McGill-Queen’s University Press • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month

Marconi

The Montreal Review of Books invited Marc Raboy, author of Marconi: The Man Who Networked the World, to answer a few questions about Guglielmo Marconi’s enduring significance and the experience of writing his biography.

Then and Now

Forty-eight and finally, I learn how to start living if that’s what it’s called. I mean, spring clean, bras cup-side up in the drawer, Japanese fantail dress detail, only some excess, and five-inch Louis Vuitton ‘Kimono’ heels. Coffee at an East Village bodega on Christmas day. December sun on walk-ups While we sat in that […]

By Nyla Matuk • "Then and Now" is taken from the book Stranger, published by Signal Editions • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month

Untitled (“We eat strawberries”)

We eat strawberries and snort Adderall Alek hands me some sort of craft beer and I think bad thoughts about America again I peel the label off and curse it It seems like a half-hearted attempt to be a Good Guy, a Myth. I practice Lying with men It’s easy, it’s all they want to […]

By Sara Sutterlin • "Untitled (“We eat strawberries”)" is taken from the book I Wanted to Be the Knife, published by Metatron • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month

Women and Power

Women and Power packs an impressive amount of information into a few pages, serving as an astute update on the issue of gender parity in Quebec and Canada. But beyond just taking stock, the book advances an appealing vision.

Hungary-Hollywood Express

Fragment follows fragment like thoughts in a mind suspended between waking and sleeping, and again and again the book returns to the life of actor and Olympian Johnny Weissmuller. And yet this novel, the first part of a trilogy, isn’t a difficult read. The prose is translucent, flowing, beautifully translated from its original French by Dimitri Nasrallah.

Untitled (“I will present a huge fire”)

I will present a huge fire I will burn the residential schools the paper acts And with a single gust of wind brush away every pipeline the caribou will come running with the buffalo the horses the deer there will be a great trembling The caribou the buffalo the horses the deer will come with […]

By Natasha Kanapé Fontaine • "Untitled (“I will present a huge fire”)" is taken from the book Assi Manifesto, published by Mawenzi House • Read our review • Posted Filed in Poem of the Month

The Party Wall

After winning several prestigious awards in its original French, Catherine Leroux’s second novel, The Party Wall, expertly translated into English by Lazer Lederhendler, has been shortlisted for this year’s Giller Prize and for a Governor General’s Literary Award for translation. And deservedly so.